Samuel E. White Monument

The past few weeks have focused a lot on the monuments constructed after the war.  After reading about the Heyward Shepherd monument,  I did a Google search on other slave monuments.  Something that struck me was this article in The New York Times from July 21, 1895.  It talks about the creation of the Samuel E. White monument at Fort Mill.  White “should be an inspiration to the people of the South, who should esteem it a sacred duty to build at the old Confederate capital a memorial column to the Southern negro in the war.”  I think it’s also important to note that the article came from the Charleston (S.C.) News and Courier.  Take a look!

The Virginia Window–Blandford Church

VirginiaI actually did my HIST 299 project on Blandford Church.  When doing my research, I found out that, to Blandford’s staff’s knowledge, there were not many, if any, digital photos of the Tiffany stained glass windows inside of the church (photography is not allowed).  What they did have were projector slides, so, with the help of Professor Blakemore, I got the slides and scanned them with a slide scanner so all of the digital world could see the beauty of Blandford’s windows!  I have a copy of all of them, but I’m attaching the window for Virginia to this post because this week’s discussion was one Virginia’s LMA’s.

Stonewall’s Statue

As Blight discusses in this week’s readings, the statue of General Stonewall Jackson in Richmond, Virginia was at the center of a large memorial celebration.    This link will bring you to a page with some old postcards of the statue, as well as a more modern photo of it, which was taken in 2007.

To remove, or not to remove, that is the question…

The link found below will direct you to a page from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s The Carolina Story: A Virtual Museum of  University History.  Specifically, the page discusses a memorial that was placed on the campus in 1913 by the United Daughters of the Confederacy to honor the alumni of the University who fought for the Confederacy.  Because of its theme, it is a very controversial memorial on campus, and it is debated as to whether or not it should be removed.  The “Confederate Monument” relates to this week’s topics within the course because commemoration and memory are two important themes being discussed.  More specifically, the monument connects to Brown’s introduction in which he mentions debates behind the removal of monuments because of the negative memories they invoke in the present day American public.

http://museum.unc.edu/exhibits/public_art/confederate_memorial/

To remove, or not to remove, that is the question…

The link found below will direct you to a page from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s The Carolina Story: A Virtual Museum of  University History.  Specifically, the page discusses a memorial that was placed on the campus in 1913 by the United Daughters of the Confederacy to honor the alumni of the University who fought for the Confederacy.  Because of its theme, it is a very controversial memorial on campus, and it is debated as to whether or not it should be removed.  The “Confederate Monument” relates to this week’s topics within the course because commemoration and memory are two important themes being discussed.  More specifically, the monument connects to Brown’s introduction in which he mentions debates behind the removal of monuments because of the negative memories they invoke in the present day American public.

http://museum.unc.edu/exhibits/public_art/confederate_memorial/