Finally, integrated prom…in Georgia

Students hold Georgia school’s 1st racially integrated prom

 

Almost half a century after the Civil Rights Act of 1964 outlawed racial discrimination in schools and other public places, black and white students in Georgia’s rural Wilcox County danced together for the first time at prom over the weekend.

“I feel like we are living Martin Luther King’s dream,” NBC station WMGT 41 quoted student Alexis Miller as saying. Miller, who is white, attended Saturday’s event with her black boyfriend.

To read the rest of the article I found click here

Posted in Uncategorized

Finally, integrated prom…in Georgia

Students hold Georgia school’s 1st racially integrated prom

 

Almost half a century after the Civil Rights Act of 1964 outlawed racial discrimination in schools and other public places, black and white students in Georgia’s rural Wilcox County danced together for the first time at prom over the weekend.

“I feel like we are living Martin Luther King’s dream,” NBC station WMGT 41 quoted student Alexis Miller as saying. Miller, who is white, attended Saturday’s event with her black boyfriend.

To read the rest of the article I found click here

Posted in Uncategorized

Spotsylvania Civil War Blog

This blog I came across is cool because it’s local. Unlike a lot of the other blogs we have reviewed, this blog is centered around a place that is not far from us, making it easier for one of us to visit one of the sites in a particular blog post to validate his/her argument, or to just even feed into curiosity.

 

http://spotsylvaniacw.blogspot.com

CSA: The Confederate States of America

I chose to watch CSA: The Confederate States of America. Kevin Willmott directed it.  As a satirical “mockumentary” it shows the history of America since the Confederates won the war and was shown on television by the British Broadcasting Channel (the fake version of BBC). In the beginning, it had a disclaimer stating that it may be unsuitable for children or servants. In the movie they rewrote historical events to show how they would have turned out in this instance. In the middle of the “program”, they aired commercials advertising products to help slave owners keep their slaves in line. For example one of the products was called “the shackle” which was permanently attached to the wrist of a slave and had a computer chip inside that would notify the police if a slave had run away. Another example of satire found in this film was the “Cotton Curtain” built along the entire border of Canada and the C.S. This was to keep the abolitionists separate from the people who were against it. Canada was considered an abolitionist country and held all sorts of integrated activities and educational programs. The program was commentated by two historians, a white Southern man, and a black Canadian woman. It also includes interviews with the 2002 Presidential Candidate, which of course, includes scandal. Mocking the Clinton scandal, this one surrounded itself between the candidates servant making claims about them being related and how their great grand parents had “been together.” The Candidate claims “My grandfather did NOT have sexual relations with that women.”

I liked this movie a lot because it provided a way to see how the political controversies would have played out in the case that the South had won. I also found the overly racist ads to be entertaining because I am sure they really show an accurate portrayal of the future we could have had as confederate states.

 

I found some of the ads on youtube. Feel free to watch :)

 

Debate over the Confederate Flag

So I was doing some searching online for other opinions on this debate and I came across this website. http://www.debate.org/opinions/should-the-confederate-flag-be-banned . You can easily see that more opinions lean towards “No” for banning the flag. Some of the arguments are really interesting, especially the few that want it banned.

Take a look!

Documentary

 

Barrett, Jenny. Shooting the Civil War: Cinema, History and American National Identity. London: I.B. Tauris, 2009.

 

Bordewich, Fergus M. “Civil War Veterans Come Alive in Audio and Video Recordings.”  http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history-archaeology/Civil-War-Veterans-Come-Alive-in-Audio-and-Video-Recordings.html (accessed February 15, 2013).

 

Callenbach, Ernest. True Grit. Film Quarterly , Vol. 23, No. 1 (Autumn, 1969), p. 57. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1211129 (accessed February 17, 2013).

 

Chowning, Larry S. Soldiers at the Doorstep: Civil War Lore. Maryland: Tidewater Publishers, 1999.

 

CSA: The Confederate States of America. DVD. Directed by Kevin Willmott. 2004; New York City, NY: IFC Films, 2006.

 

 

Davis, Burke. The Civil War: Strange and Fascinating Facts. New York: Wings Books, 1960.

 

Gettysburg. DVD. Directed by Ronald F. Maxwell. 1991; Hollywood, CA: Turner Pictures, 1993.

 

Johnson, Wookie. “‘John Carter’ and Eight Other Films With Confederate Protagonists.” http://www.screenjunkies.com/movies/movie-lists/john-carter-and-8-other-films-with-confederate-protagonists/1/ (accessed February 15, 2013).

 

Koresky, Michael. 2004. Cold Mountain. Film Comment 40, no. 1: 74-75, http://ezproxy.umw.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/210288602?accountid=12299. (accessed February 15, 2013).

 

Rollins, Peter C. and John E. O’Connor. “America’s Wars in Film and History: Why We Fought.” Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 2008.

 

Spehr, Paul C. “The Civil War in Motion Pictures: A Bibliography of Films Produced in the United States in 1897. Washington DC: Library of Congress Publications, 1961.

 

Strauss, J. (2008). Myth and Memory: The Civil War in Fiction and Film From Uncle Tom’s Cabin to Cold Mountain. Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly, 85(1), 216-217. http://ezproxy.umw.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/216939737?accountid=12299 (accessed February 15, 2013).

 

Stokes, Melvyn. D.W. Griffith’s “The Birth of a Nation”: A History of “the Most Controversial Film of All Time.” New York: Oxford University Press, 2007.

 

 

The Birth of a Nation. DVD. Directed by D.W. Griffith. 1914: David W. Griffith Corp., 1915.

 

True Grit. DVD. Directed by Joel & Ethan Coen. 2010; Hollywood, CA: Paramount Pictures, 2010.

 

Ward, Geoffrey C. “A Rebel Remembers.” American Heritage, November 1995. http://www.americanheritage.com/content/rebel-remembers (accessed March 5, 2013).

 

Watson, W. (2009). D.W. Griffith’s “The Birth of a Nation”: A History of ‘the Most Controversial Film of All Time’. Southern Quarterly, 47(1), 172-176,185. http://ezproxy.umw.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/222241148?accountid=12299 (accessed February 17, 2013).

 

Wills, Brian S. Gone with the Glory: The Civil War in Cinema. New York: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers Inc., 2007.

 

Using iMovie

So, I am by no means familiar with the majority of the programs on my mac, including iMovie. While putting together pieces of my documentary, I ran into a hundred issues. Luckily, I found this website that gives video tutorials of how to use the program and I must say, it is AMAZING. I hope this helps!

Good Luck!

Ana

Interesting Website

Thought that this was kind of cool. It is a website that gives 8 movies where the main character is a Confederate soldier. It also gives a brief synopsis.

 

http://www.screenjunkies.com/movies/movie-lists/john-carter-and-8-other-films-with-confederate-protagonists/

The Portrayal of Confederate Soldiers in Film

                                    Ana Yildirim

Hist. 471

Civil War In American Memory

 Dr. McClurken, Spring 2013

The Portrayal of Confederate Soldiers in Film

            This documentary will uncover the changes in Civil War films over time. Whether films have approached the subject in either a fictitious, satirical, or historical way, the soldiers are always the ones that gain the most attention. This is because they are literally the “stars” of the war, the same way they become the stars of the films. Since the first Civil War movies had been produced, it has become evident that the shift in the approach has begun to cater more towards aspects of entertainment and money making, then it had in its previous decades. Throughout the documentary, various examples of scenes will be taken from these films, and will be compared with one another to show that Confederate soldiers are not typically the “civil” soldiers, like those of the Union. This documentary will also include the opinions and thoughts of non-scholars who have seen the films, in order to see where the public stands on this topic, and also how influential these films are in providing perspective. People are easily influenced from what they witness in these films, and that is a major issue in regards to how the memory of the war is carried on. This is because, unfortunately, many people believe what they see on television and in cinema to be true. If they are being provided with false accounts of Confederate soldiers, it is likely that they will continue to believe what they see on the big screen, and remember the Civil War through the eyes of the director.

Scholarly approaches to this subject as a whole are minimal, however, the combined reactions to specific films will allow for demonstrating this topic.

 

 

 

Bordewich, Fergus M. Civil War Veterans Come Alive in Audio and Video Recordings. http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history-archaeology/Civil-War-Veterans-Come-Alive-in-Audio-and-Video-Recordings.html (accessed February 15, 2013).

This a collection of interviews from ex- Confederate soldiers. Whether not the interviews were edited for a specific audience or not, this is a first hand look at how the soldiers felt will allow for further interpretation of portrayal.

 

Butler, Richard. 2011. It’s Only Make Believe: The Implications of Fictional and Authentic Locations in Films. Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes 3, no. 2: 91-101, http://ezproxy.umw.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/864103631?accountid=12299. (accessed February 15, 2013).

This paper discusses the extent to which film locations affect the decision making of tourists and overall attractiveness of film locations as tourist destinations. It addresses various films in which battle fields of the Civil War have been glorified to attract visitors.

 

Callenbach, Ernest. True Grit. Film Quarterly , Vol. 23, No. 1 (Autumn, 1969), p. 57. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1211129 (accessed February 17, 2013).

This is a review for the original True Grit film produced in 1969. It provides insight on the film and a positive reaction, which will be used in arguing the reaction of the public.

 

CSA: The Confederate States of America. DVD. Directed by Kevin Willmott. 2004; New York City, NY: IFC Films, 2006.

This film is a satire, which shows what would have happened to the United States, had the Union lost and the Confederacy victorious. This will become helpful in determining how soldiers are perceived in the sense of fictitious films.

 

Gettysburg. DVD. Directed by Ronald F. Maxwell. 1991; Hollywood, CA: Turner Pictures, 1993.

This film was a very popular Civil War movie. The courage and strength of the Confederate soldiers are portrayed in a way that is distinguishable from the Union.

 

Hillyer, Reiko. Relics of Reconciliation: The Confederate Museum and Civil War Memory in the New South. The Public Historian , Vol. 33, No. 4 (November 2011), pp. 35-62. http://www.jstor.org.ezproxy.umw.edu/stable/pdfplus/10.1525/tph.2011.33.4.35.pdf?acceptTC=true (accessed February 13, 2013).

This museum depicts slavery as benevolent; the museum’s exhibits reinforced the notion that Jim Crow was a just and effective means of managing postwar southern society. Although this source does not directly link to film, it describes the museum, which can possibly be indirectly linking itself with portrayal of soldiers in film, in the same fashion as they are portrayed in the exhibits.

Johnson, Wookie. ‘John Carter’ And 8 Other Films With Confederate Protagonists. http://www.screenjunkies.com/movies/movie-lists/john-carter-and-8-other-films-with-confederate-protagonists/1/ (accessed February 15, 2013).

This website, although not scholarly, provides an interesting summary for films that have Confederate protagonists. This will open doors to public perspective on the portrayal of Confederate soldiers.

 

Joyce, Simon and Jennifer Putzi. “Greatest Combination in Motion Pictures”: Film History and the Division of Labor in the New York Motion Picture Company” Film History 21, no 3 (2009) 189-207. http://www.jstor.org/stable/40405933 (accessed February 11, 2013).

This source provides insight on different issues that may have influenced filmmakers and writers to approach their films with a bias. That being said, it will allow for further development of arguing why Confederate soldiers are not portrayed the same in every film.

 

Koresky, Michael. 2004. Cold Mountain. Film Comment 40, no. 1: 74-75, http://ezproxy.umw.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/210288602?accountid=12299. (accessed February 15, 2013).

This review provides a good summary of the movie Cold Mountain. It will become helpful when analyzing the film.

 

Rollins, Peter C. and John E. O’Connor. “America’s Wars in Film and History: Why We Fought.” Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 2008.

This book describes how people are easily influences by film, specifically focusing on the Civil War.

 

Spehr, Paul C. “The Civil War in Motion Pictures: A Bibliography of Films Produced in the United States in 1897. Washington DC: Library of Congress Publications, 1961.

This book focuses on the different ways the Civil War has been portrayed in films over time. This will help in the historiography of this assignment.

 

Strauss, J. (2008). Myth and Memory: The Civil War in Fiction and Film From Uncle Tom’s Cabin to Cold Mountain. Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly, 85(1), 216-217. http://ezproxy.umw.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/216939737?accountid=12299 (accessed February 15, 2013).

This source addresses the fiction behind many portrayals of the Civil War in different films. It will become evident how Confederate soldiers portrayed differently from Union soldiers.

 

The Birth of a Nation. DVD. Directed by D.W. Griffith. 1914: David W. Griffith Corp., 1915.

This is one of the earliest Civil War films. Although silent, it has been named one of the most 100 important films in the History of American films. This will be the beginning of the chronological approach. Also, it will provide the backbone for determining how different films are today in regards to the treatment of race.

 

True Grit. DVD. Directed by Joel & Ethan Coen. 2010; Hollywood, CA: Paramount Pictures, 2010.

In a battle to determine who has the most “grit” this film depicts confederate soldiers attempting to do so. It will be one of the primary examples in arguing how confederate soldiers are portrayed.

 

Watson, W. (2009). D.W. Griffith’s “The Birth of a Nation”: A History of ‘the Most Controversial Film of All Time’. Southern Quarterly, 47(1), 172-176,185. http://ezproxy.umw.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/222241148?accountid=12299 (accessed February 17, 2013).

This source described the controversy behind The Birth of a Nation. It will become useful when arguing the shift in the approach to civil war films.